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Tests and procedures - information for our patients

Electrocardiogram (ECG)
What is an Electrocardiogram (ECG)?
An electrocardiogram (ECG) is one of the simplest and fastest procedures used to evaluate the heart. Electrodes (small, plastic patches) are placed at certain locations on the chest, arms, or legs. When the electrodes are connected to an ECG machine by lead wires, a graphic representation, or tracing, of the electrical activity can be obtained. This electrical activity is measured, interpreted, and printed out for the doctor's information and further interpretation.
This type of ECG usually takes five to 10 minutes to complete and is a safe procedure with no known risks. It’s completely painless and non-invasive, as the skin is in no way penetrated and no electric current is sent to the body. On occasion the patient may be allergic or sensitive to the electrodes causing local skin reddening.

Why is an Electrocardiogram (ECG) performed?
An electrocardiogram (ECG) is performed as part of a routine physical examination or screening evaluation. Some of the various heart problems that can be diagnosed by ECG include:
• Enlargement of the heart
• Congenital heart defects involving the conducting (electrical) system
• Abnormal rhythm (arrhythmia) – rapid, slow or irregular heart beats
• Damage to the heart such as when one of the heart's arteries is blocked (coronary occlusion)
• Poor blood supply to the heart
• Abnormal position of the heart
• Heart inflammation – pericarditis or myocarditis
• Cardiac arrest during emergency room or intensive care monitoring
• Disturbances of the heart's conducting system
• Imbalances in the blood chemicals (electrolytes) that control heart activity.

Carotid Duplex Scan
What is a Carotid Duplex Scan?
A carotid duplex scan is an ultrasound used to visualise the blood flow and possible narrowing of the vessels that supply blood to your brain.
The test requires an ultrasound probe to be placed on your neck. A series of dynamic images of your carotid arteries will be recorded. From those images, a detailed assessment of your carotid and vertebral arteries is performed. The information is recorded and reviewed by a cardiologist.


Why is a Carotid Duplex Scan done?
Carotid duplex ultrasound scanning is the main investigation for the detection of plaque which may cause narrowing in the arteries that supply blood to the brain, and may lead to strokes or mini-strokes.
Additionally they are frequently performed for follow-up after surgery (endarterectomy) or stenting of the carotid arteries. It is also a useful test to determine whether you are developing vascular disease.


How should I prepare for a Carotid Duplex Scan?
No special preparation is required for the Carotid ultrasound.
You will be lying down, with the neck exposed. You won’t need to undress. Ultrasound gel will be put on your neck and the sonographer will examine the carotid arteries to determine the presence of any plaque and narrowing. During the study you will experience some minor pushing and pressure on your neck, and you will need to tilt your head from side to side. The scan takes about 45 min and is painless and non invasive.
There is no radiation involved


24 Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor
What is a 24 Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor?
An Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor is a small device, no larger than a mobile phone, which is used to regularly measure and record blood pressure over a 24 hour period. It is a simple, effective method of monitoring your Blood Pressure over an extended period.

Why is a 24 Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor done?
Results from a 24 Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor will indicate whether you have high blood pressure and assess the control of your blood pressure over a longer period. One-off Blood Pressure readings may not reveal periods of poorly controlled hight blood pressure. An Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor will indicate fluctuations in blood pressure, as readings are taken regularly over a period of 24 hours.

The Monitor automatically inflates the cuff, measures and records blood pressure and heart rate readings half hourly during the day and hourly during the night. This allows evaluation of the efficacy of a medication or how your blood pressure responds during your daily routine.

How should I prepare for a 24 Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor?
As you wear the Blood Pressure Monitor continuously for a 24 hour period and as it is an electronic device which cannot get wet, it is beneficial to shower before the Monitor is fitted.
It is advisable to wear a two piece outfit with a loose top and sleeve while doing the test.
Please do not use cream or talc on your chest area on the day of the test.
Take your usual medications (unless your Doctor advises otherwise). Please bring a list of your medications and your referral.


What is involved?
To allow our Nurse to fit the Blood Pressure Monitor you will need to remove your blouse or shirt.
You will have a Blood Pressure Cuff on your arm just above the elbow on your dominant arm for the 24 hours, this is connected to the Monitor.
The Monitor is stored in a cloth pouch and worn diagonally across your chest for the duration of the test.
Our Nurse will take the first Blood Pressure reading once the Monitor is fitted.
Please be careful not to get the Monitor wet. You will not be able to shower while you wear the Monitor, so it is beneficial to shower before the Monitor is fitted.
Once the Monitor is in place, do not touch or adjust the Monitor.
You are then ready to wear the Blood Pressure Monitor for a "regular" day - carry on with normal activities.
The Monitor automatically inflates the cuff, measures and records blood pressure and heart rate readings half hourly during the day and hourly during the night.
Each time the cuff inflates, relax your arm, letting it hang straight, not bent. Try to keep your arm as still as possible during the reading or the cuff will inflate again until a correct reading is taken.
Please record your activities and any symptoms (eg headache, dizziness, light headedness, fainting etc.) and the time and duration you experience them in the Event Diary to help the Doctor make a more accurate evaluation. Please also record the circumstances associated with the symptoms.
Keep the Diary and a pen with you at all times.
Do not have X-rays taken while wearing the Blood Pressure Monitor.
The Monitor runs on batteries and, therefore, requires no external power source.
Having worn the Monitor for 24 hours, please return the Blood Pressure Monitor to reception at Peninsula Cardiology Centre at the specified time.


How long will it take?
It only takes about 15 minutes to have the 24 Hour Blood Pressure Monitor put on. The patient will return the next day to have the Monitor removed, this should only take 10 minutes. Please bring your completed Diary.

Does it hurt?
The procedure is not painful, however, you will be aware each time the cuff inflates and some patients find this uncomfortable. The use of the Monitor is safe, it is particularly compact and only worn for 24 hours.

When will my referring GP get the report?
The data is downloaded and analysed and a report prepared. Your General Practitioner will receive the report by mail. They are usually mailed out within a week of the test. Urgent reports can be faxed directly to your General Practitioner.

How soon can I get an appointment?
Patients can usually obtain an appointment at Peninsula Cardiology Centre for a 24 Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor test within 2 to 5 working days.

Exercice Stress ECG
What is an Exercice Stress ECG?
An exercise ECG is performed to assess the heart's response to stress or exercise. The ECG is monitored while a person is exercising on a treadmill.
An ECG tracing will be taken at certain points during the test in order to compare the effects of increasing stress on the heart. Periodically, the incline and treadmill speed will be increased in order to make exercise more difficult for the person being tested. The person will exercise until reaching a target heart rate (determined by the doctor based on age and physical status) or until unable to continue due to fatigue, shortness of breath, chest pain, or other symptoms. Changes in an ECG during exercise compared to the resting tracing may indicate one or more of several heart-related conditions.
This electrical activity of the heart is measured by an electrocardiogram. By placing electrodes at specific locations on the body (chest, arms, or legs).

Reasons why an Exercice Stress ECG would be requested
Reasons for your physician to request an exercise ECG include, but are not limited to, the following:
• To assess for suspected coronary artery disease (blocked arteries in the heart)
• To assess stress or exercise tolerance in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease
• To determine limits for safe exercise in patients who are entering a cardiac rehabilitation program and/or those who are recovering from a cardiac event, such as a heart attack (myocardial infarction, or MI) or heart surgery
• To assess heart rhythm or electrical activity during exercise
• To evaluate heart rate and blood pressure during exercise
There may be other reasons for your doctor to recommend an exercise ECG.

Risks of the procedure
Because of the stress the heart incurs during the procedure, there is a small chance for chest pain, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeats, dizziness, nausea or fatigue. Fainting, cardiac arrest, or serious heart rhythm problems are exceptionally rare. Your overseeing doctor will assess any concerns promptly.
For safety reasons, generally you will not be requested to perform a stress test if you have:
• Aneurysm (a dilation of a part of the heart muscle or the aorta)
• Unstable angina (uncontrolled chest pain)
• Severe heart valve disease
• Severe congestive heart failure
• Recent myocardial infarction (also called MI, or heart attack)
• Severe hypertension (high blood pressure)
• Uncontrolled irregular heartbeats

During the procedure
Generally, an exercise ECG follows this process:
• You will be asked to open your blouse or shirt in the front (undergarments on women should remain worn whilst men may be asked to remove their shirts). The technician will ensure your privacy.
• If your chest is very hairy, the technician may shave or clip small patches of hair, as needed, so that the electrodes will stick closely to the skin.
• Electrodes will be attached to your chest and abdomen.
• A blood pressure cuff will be attached to your arm while you are sitting down. Initial, or baseline, ECG and blood pressure readings will be taken while you are sitting down and standing up.
• You will be instructed on how to walk on the treadmill. You will be told to let the technician, doctor, or nurse know if you begin to have any chest pain, dizziness, light-headedness, extreme shortness of breath, nausea, headache, leg pains, or other symptoms during exercise.
• You will begin to exercise at a minimal level. The intensity of the exercise will be gradually increased on the treadmill by increasing the incline and speed of the treadmill every few minutes.
• ECG and blood pressure readings will be taken periodically during the exercise to measure how well your heart and body are responding to the exercise.
• The desired length of exercise is based upon a target heart rate (determined by the doctor based on your age and physical condition) and your own exercise tolerance. Your exercise duration is an important factor in the stress test result. The test may be stopped if you develop severe symptoms, such as chest pain, dizziness, nausea, severe shortness of breath, severe fatigue, or elevated blood pressure.
• Once your ECG and blood pressure readings are acceptable to the doctor, the ECG electrodes and blood pressure cuff will be removed. You may then get dressed.
• This type of ECG takes about 15 to 30 minutes to complete.

After the procedure
Generally, there is no special care following an exercise ECG.
Notify your doctor if you develop any signs or symptoms (such as, chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, or fainting).

Transthoracic Echocardiogram
What is a Transthoracic Echocardiogram?
A transthoracic echocardiogram is an ultrasound scan of the heart using high frequency sound waves to see all four chambers of the heart, the heart valves and the sac around the heart.

Why is a Transthoracic Echocardiogram done?
This test will help the Doctor identify abnormalities of heart structure and function.
Ultrasound allows accurate measurement of the four chambers of the heart and can display a cross-section of the beating heart, including the chambers, valves and major blood vessels that exit the heart.
The pumping function or strength of the heart is measured.
The images show us how well the muscle and valves are working, how blood is flowing through the heart, and how much damage has been done after a heart attack. An echo can also be helpful to investigate palpitations or chest pain and to look for fluid in the sac around the heart.

How should I prepare for a Transthoracic Echocardiogram?
No special preparation is necessary.
It is advisable to wear a two piece outfit for the test.
Take your usual medications and please bring a list of your medications and your referral.


What is involved?
An Echocardiogram is performed by our highly trained Sonographers.
During an Echocardioagram you need to remove all clothing above the waist and lie on a bed on your left side with the left arm extended above your head.
You will be provided with a towel for modesty and to keep warm while the test is being performed.
Small adhesive patches called electrodes are attached to your chest and shoulders to detect the electrical pulses in your heart. These are connected via leads to the ultrasound machine to monitor the heart rate during the echo.
The Sonographer places some gel on your chest and moves a transducer (a hand-held device) over the chest to transmit and receive pulses of sound waves to produce an image of the internal structures of the heart. The gel may feel cool.
During the test the room lights will be dimmed to reduce glare and improve the view of images on the screen.
The transducer is moved to take images from different parts of the chest to obtain several views of the heart. Slight pressure is required to ensure good quality pictures. You will be asked to move from your back to your left side, to breathe slowly or hold your breath. This helps in obtaining higher quality pictures.
The images are constantly viewed on the monitor and are saved on the equipment's hard disk for review by the Cardiologist.
You will hear some sounds, this is a computerized sound representing your blood flow.
At the end of the test the Sonographer will wipe off any remaining gel.


How long will it take?
Allow approximately 45 minutes for the complete test.

Does it hurt?
The procedure is totally painless, however, you may feel some slight discomfort. The sound waves will not cause any damage to the heart.
The electrodes may sometimes leave red marks, these will fade away in a few days time.

When will my referring GP get the report?
Precise measurements will be taken from the images and compared with any previous echocardiograms. A Cardiologist will look at the test. A report will be sent to your General Practitioner by mail. They are usually mailed within two working days of your test. Urgent reports can be faxed directly to your General Practitioner.

How soon can I get an appointment?
Patients can usually obtain an appointment at Peninsula Cardiology Centre for a Transthoracic Echo within 10 days.

24 Hour Holter Monitor
What is a 24 Hour Holter Monitor?
A Holter Monitor is a small computerised device, no larger than a mobile phone, which is used to continuously detect and record all heart rhythms over a 24 hour period - usually 100,000 heart beats in a day!
You wear the Holter Monitor for 24 hours - it is easy and painless.

Why is a 24 Hour Holter Monitor done?
Your General Practitioner may request this test if you suffer palpitations (where your heart beats excessively or abnormally), to determine if your heart goes "too fast" or "too slow", to investigate dizziness, light-headedness or blackouts, to test the effects of some cardiac medications or if you have a known cardiac condition.

It is often hard to pick up an unusual heart rhythm unless it occurs when you are at your Doctor's rooms or the hospital. The Holter Monitor will record every heart beat for a 24 hour period. Hopefully, by covering a longer period your unusual heart rhythm will be recorded. You have a button to press to mark an episode of dizziness, breathlessness, chest pain or when your heart is beating abnormally. On review, we can then pay particular attention to these heart rhythms to recognise what happened at that particular time.

A Holter Monitor helps evaluate the type and amount of irregular heart beats during usual physical activities, exercise and sleep.

How should I prepare for a 24 Hour Holter Monitor?
As you wear the Holter Monitor continuously for a 24 hour period and as it is an electronic device which cannot get wet, it is beneficial to shower before the Holter is fitted.
It is advisable to wear a two piece outfit with a loose top while doing the test.
Please do not use cream or talc on your chest area on the day of the test.
Take your usual medications (unless your Doctor advises otherwise). Please bring a list of your medications and your referral.


What is involved?
To allow our Nurse to fit the Holter Monitor you will need to remove your blouse or shirt.
Our Nurse puts 7 small adhesive patches called electrodes on your chest and back to detect the electrical pulses in your heart.
A nurse will use an alcohol swab to prepare your skin where the electrodes will be placed. The alcohol may feel cold.
Some men may need small areas of their chest shaved to ensure the electrodes adhere well.
The electrodes are connected to wires called leads which are attached to a small recording box. The box is stored in a cloth pouch and worn diagonally across your chest for the duration of the test.
Please be careful not to get the recorder wet. You will not be able to shower while you wear the recorder, so it is beneficial to shower before the Holter is fitted.
Once the Monitor is in place, do not touch or adjust the electrodes or the Monitor.
You are then ready to wear the Holter Monitor for a "regular" day - carry on with normal activities, however, very strenuous activities eg lawnmowing can interfere with data recording.
Press the event button as soon as you have a symptom and record the time and nature of the symptom in the Diary.
Please record your activities and any symptoms (eg palpitations, dizziness, shortness of breath, chest, neck, arm or jaw discomfort, excessive fatigue, nausea etc.) and the time and duration you experience them in the Event Diary to help the Doctor make a more accurate evaluation. Please also record the circumstances associated with the symptoms.
Keep the Diary and a pen with you at all times.
Do not have X-rays taken while wearing the Holter Monitor.
Having worn the Monitor for 24 hours, please return the Holter Monitor to Peninsula Cardiology Centre. Our Cardiologist will report on the heart rhythms.


How long will it take?
It only takes about 15 minutes to have the Holter Monitor put on. The patient will return the next day to have the Monitor removed, this should only take 10 minutes. Please bring your completed Diary.

Does it hurt?
The procedure is totally painless. The use of the Monitor is safe and comfortable, as it is particularly compact. The electrodes may sometimes leave red marks, these will fade away in a few days time.

When will my referring GP get the report?
The data is downloaded and analysed and a report prepared. A Cardiologist will review the test results. Your General Practitioner will receive the report by mail. They are usually mailed within two working days of the end of the test. Urgent reports can be faxed directly to your General Practitioner.

How soon can I get an appointment?
Patients can usually obtain an appointment at Peninsula Cardiology Centre for a Holter Monitor Test on the same day or within one working day.

Stress Echocardiogram ( Treadmill/Dobutamine)
What is a Stress Echocardiogram ( Treadmill/Dobutamine) ?
Exercise stress echocardiography, which is usually shortened to exercise stress echo or ESE, is a test combining exercise treadmill testing and cardiac ultrasound (echocardiography) to diagnose abnormalities of the cardiac chambers and coronary arteries.
This test uses ultrasound pictures of the heart (also called echocardiography, or echo) to assess the state of the pumping chamber of the heart (the left ventricle) at rest. The patient then exercises on a treadmill, to speed their heart rate up. This increases the demands on the heart. The blood supply to the heart, via the coronary arteries, has to increase to meet these demands. After the treadmill is stopped, further images of the pumping chamber of the heart are recorded. This allows the pumping action of the heart to be assessed after exercise, compared to at rest.
Because exercise stress echo uses heart ultrasound as well as ECG, it is usually more accurate than treadmill testing because of the additional information collected. In addition, it does not involve needles or exposure to medical radiation.

Principles of Stress Echocardiogram ( Treadmill/Dobutamine)
The pumping chamber of the heart responds to exercise by an increase in heart rate and an increase in contractility (the pumping action of the heart). Blood pressure also increases with exercise. If there is a blocked coronary artery, the part of heart muscle past the blockage does not obtain sufficient blood supply when exercise is performed. This is because when the heart exercises, it requires a higher blood flow to each part of the heart. This increased blood supply to the muscular wall of the heart occurs by increased blood flow in the coronary arteries. If one or several coronary arteries are blocked, a normal increase in pumping action is not seen. One part of the heart muscle will not increase contractility normally.

What sort of patients undergo this test?
There are three main groups of patients who undergo stress echo. The first group are those who have experienced cardiac symptoms – mainly chest discomfort or shortness-of-breath. In these patients, the referring doctor wants to know if coronary heart disease (narrowings of the coronary arteries) could be causing these symptoms.
The second group are patients whom have had a exercise stress test without ultrasound imaging, and have an abnormal resting ECG. These patients require ultrasound imaging so the stress test can be analysed. Other patients may have ECG changes during stress testing that are a technical anomaly rather than reflecting the presence of heart disease. Stress echocardiography can very often diagnose or exclude heart disease in these patients.
The third group of patients are those whom have established heart disease: for example, a previous heart attack (myocardial infarction), and those whom have intra-coronary stents or whom have had coronary artery bypass grafting (cardiac bypass surgery). In these patients, cardiologists use stress echo to ensure the contractility of the heart chambers after exercise is normal, which suggests the blood flow through the stents and bypass grafts is normal. Stress echo is a good way of monitoring patients’ progress over time, as it does not involve medical radiation, and it allows direct imaging with ultrasound of the chambers of the heart.

How should I prepare for a Stress Echocardiogram ( Treadmill/Dobutamine) ?
Please wear comfortable walking or running shoes. Women should wear a top and pants or shorts, rather than a dress. Do not eat a heavy meal prior to the test. However you do not need to fast before this test. You will be asked to withhold any tablets that slow down the heart rate including beta-blockers (such as Metoprolol), Diltiazem and Isoptin. You will be asked about what medication you are on at the time of booking, and will be advised on when to stop these medications prior to the exercise stress echo. If stopping these tablets causes problems for you, such as high blood pressures or palpitations, please discuss this with the staff at the time of booking, as it may be possible for you to still do the test while on your normal medication.

What is involved?
You will be asked to put a gown on. Small sticky ECG dots will be applied to the front and left side of your chest to record an ECG during the test, and a blood pressure cuff will be applied to your arm. You will lie down on a couch so the cardiologist can record the ultrasound images of your heart at rest.
You will then walk on a treadmill for a few minutes until your heart rate has increased. Your blood pressure and a continuous ECG (heart rhythm trace) will be recorded, and the nurse and doctor will ask you if you feel symptoms such as chest pain. The treadmill will stop when your heart rate is adequate for the test (usually between 110 and 150 beats per minute, depending on your age). You will lie back down on the couch, and the images of your rapidly beating heart (called the post exercise images) will be recorded. Your ECG and blood pressure will be continued to be monitored in this recovery phase. The cardiologist will compare the resting images of your heart to the images taken after exercise, and decide whether all areas of the heart muscle increase contractility normally in response to exercise.
Most people do not need to jog or run on the treadmill to increase their heart rate to the required amount. Usually, a brisk walk is sufficient.
We use a standardised treadmill protocol which is used in most countries of the world for stress testing, called the Bruce protocol. This treadmill protocol starts with a slow 3-minute warm up phase, before the treadmill gradient and speed increases. The pace and gradient increase a little every three minutes until the desired heart rate is reached. Most patients walk for between 4 to 8 minutes on the treadmill. Some patients can complete as much as 12 minutes.
If a patient wants to stop for any reason before the test is completed, the test can be interrupted and the peak heart images can still be collected.

How long will it take?
Although most patients walk on the treadmill for 4 to 8 minutes, we give a longer booking time for this test (45 minutes or longer) to allow time for you and for the ultrasound machine to be set-up, to allow plenty of time for recovery, to allow completion of the recording of all the information needed, and for preparation of the report of your test, which is returned to your referring doctor.

What happens next?
If your test is normal, it is likely you will not need any further cardiac tests.
If the test shows an abnormality with the pumping chamber of the heart after exercise, you may need a coronary angiogram, which is a dye injection test of the coronary arteries. If you need this test, it can be organised for you at the same appointment.
The report will be sent to your referring doctor on the day you have the test.

What if I can not walk easily?
Many patients cannot walk easily due to musculoskeletal problems of the knees, hips, ankles or back. If you can walk, but find a flat gradient or a slower speed easier, you may still be able to use the treadmill very successfully. We have a range of protocols available, some with a flatter gradient and slower treadmill speed.
If you are severely disabled and cannot walk at all, stress echo can still be performed, but not using the treadmill. In this case we use a short intravenous infusion of a cardiac stimulant medication, called Dobutamine. This acts on the heart directly to increase the pumping action of the heart and the heart rate. This medication is infused gradually to increase the heart rate to the desired level. The patient spends the entire test lying down on the echo couch.

How do I get more information?
Our clerical staff can answer your questions at the time of booking. The supervising nurse and doctor will also be happy to discuss any questions or concerns you may have.

7 day Event Recorder
What is a 7 day Event Recorder?
An Event Recorder is a small device, no larger than a mobile phone, which is worn for between 1 and 3 weeks to record heart rhythms when activated by the patient. You wear the Event Recorder throughout the test : it is easy and painless.

Why is a 7 day Event Recorder done?
Your General Practitioner may request this test if you suffer palpitations (where your heart beats excessively or abnormally), to determine if your heart goes "too fast" or "too slow", to investigate dizziness, light-headedness or blackouts, to test the effects of some cardiac medications or if you have a known cardiac condition.


It is often hard to pick up an unusual heart rhythm unless it occurs when you are at your Doctor's rooms or the hospital. Hopefully, by wearing the Event Recorder for a longer period you will be able to record your heart rythms when you experince symptoms. You have yellow button to press to start recording when you experience an episode of dizziness, breathlessness, chest pain or when your heart is beating abnormally. The recorder will then store approximately 30 : 60 seconds of heart rhythm preceeding and following the activation.

How should I prepare for a 7 day Event Recorder?
  • You wear the Event Recorder continuously for a 1 to 3 week period, taking it off whilst showering.
  • Please do not use cream or talc on your chest area on the days of wearing the recorder.
  • Please bring your referral.

  • Home Apnoea Monitor
    What is a Home Apnoea Monitor?
    A Sleep Apnoea Monitor is a small device which is used to measure chest movement, oxygen saturation and pulse, nasal flow and snoring over an eight hour period while you sleep in your own bed in familiar surroundings. It is a simple, effective method of diagnosing Sleep Apnoea.
    Patients appreciate being able to do the test while sleeping in the comfort of their own bed in familiar surroundings.

    Why is a Home Apnoea Monitor done?
    Sleep Apnoea is a condition which causes constant breathing disturbances while the sufferer sleeps. The airways become blocked, causing the patient to struggle to breathe or even stop breathing during sleep. It can lead to high blood pressure, rhythm problems, heart disease and stroke.

    How should I prepare for a Home Apnoea Monitor?
    • There is no special preparation for a Sleep Apnoea Monitor.
    • Take your usual medications and please bring a list of your medications and your referral.

    What is involved?
    • You need to come to Peninsula Cardiology Centre to be fitted for the belts around your chest and abdomen, which you will wear overnight, we will show you how to put the bands on and we will program the Monitor so it turns itself on at your anticipated bedtime.
    • You will wear 3 belts over your pyjamas.One holds the compact, lightweight monitor.The Monitor runs on batteries and therefore, requires no external power source.
    • The other two belts around your abdomen and your chest measure the movement as you breathe.
    • A small device on your finger measures your oxygen saturation and pulse.
    • You will have tubing in your nostrils to measure nasal flow and snoring.
    • You can get out of bed at night and move around, without having to detach wires.

    How long will it take?
    It takes about 15 minutes for us to adjust the chest bands for you, show you how to put on the bands and program the Monitor. You wear the Monitor for 8 hours overnight. The next day you need to return the Monitor to reception at Peninsula Cardiology Centre.

    Does it hurt?
    The procedure is not painful, however, you may find the tubing in your nostrils uncomfortable and you will not be able to sleep lying on your stomach. The use of the Monitor is safe, it is lighweight and quite compact.

    When will my referring GP get the report?
    The data is downloaded and analysed and a report prepared. Your General Practitioner will receive the report by mail. They are usually mailed out within a week of the test. Urgent reports can be faxed directly to your General Practitioner.

    How soon can I get an appointment?
    Patients can usually obtain an appointment at Peninsula Cardiology Centre for a Home Apnoea Monitor within a week.